He stated that he was born in Rolling Fork, Mississippi, in 1915, but other evidence suggests that he was born in Jug's Corner, in neighboring Issaquena County, in 1913. [33] Korner and Davies' own groups included musicians who would later form the Rolling Stones (named after Muddy's 1950 hit "Rollin' Stone"), Cream, and the original Fleetwood Mac. Man, you don't know how I felt that Saturday afternoon when I heard that voice and it was my own voice. [11] The remains of the cabin on Stovall Plantation where he lived in his youth are now at the Delta Blues Museum in Clarksdale, Mississippi. [19] Big Bill Broonzy, then one of the leading bluesmen in Chicago, had Muddy open his shows in the rowdy clubs where Broonzy played. Willie Dixon said that "There was quite a few people around singing the blues but most of them was singing all sad blues. The performance was made available on DVD in 2009 by Shout! It was a Stella. In 1958, he traveled to England, laying the foundations of the resurgence of interest in the blues there. Write in a gratitude journal each day in order to consistently recognize all of the great things that you have in your life. The next court date was set for July 10, 2018. Both albums were the brainchild of Chess Records producer Norman Dayron, and were intended to showcase Chicago blues musicians playing with the younger British rock musicians whom they had inspired. In 2010, his heir was petitioning for the courts to appoint Mercy Morganfield, his daughter, as administrator and distribute remaining assets, which mainly consists of copyrights to his music. His last public performance took place when he sat in with Eric Clapton's band at a concert in Florida in the summer of 1982. The song was also covered by Canned Heat at the Monterey Pop Festival and later adapted by Bob Dylan on his album Modern Times. Gibbons eventually converted the wood into a guitar. One of Led Zeppelin's biggest hits, "Whole Lotta Love", is based on the Muddy Waters hit "You Need Love" (written by Willie Dixon). "He brought his stuff down and recorded me right in my house," Waters told Rolling Stone magazine, "and when he played back the first song I sounded just like anybody's records. Gaining custody of his three children, Joseph, Renee, and Rosalind, he moved them into his home, eventually buying a new house in Westmont, Illinois. The rivalry was, in part, stoked by Willie Dixon providing songs to both artists, with Wolf suspecting that Muddy was getting Dixon's best songs. [61] In 2017, a ten stories-mural commissioned as a part of the Chicago Blues Festival and designed by Brazilian artist Eduardo Kobra was painted on the side of the building at 17 North State Street, at the corner of State and Washington Streets. Hoppkorv was the seventh album by the American blues rock band Hot Tuna, and their last studio album recorded for Grunt Records, as Grunt BFL1-1920. [66], The British band The Rolling Stones named themselves after Muddy Waters' 1950 song "Rollin' Stone". [60], Two years after his death, the city of Chicago paid tribute to him by designating the one-block section between 900 and 1000 East 43rd Street near his former home on the south side "Honorary Muddy Waters Drive". [65], On June 25, 2019, The New York Times Magazine listed Muddy Waters among hundreds of artists whose material was reportedly destroyed in the 2008 Universal fire. The band Cream covered "Rollin' and Tumblin'" on their 1966 debut album, Fresh Cream. [43], Later in 1969, he recorded and released the album Fathers and Sons, which featured a return to his classic Chicago blues sound. They said, "This can't be Muddy Waters with all this shit going on – all this wow-wow and fuzztone. The people ordered them from Sears-Roebuck in Chicago. Muddy was giving his blues a little pep." An' if you change my sound, then you gonna change the whole man." '"[6] Lomax came back in July 1942 to record him again. In addition to four new original songs by Jorma Kaukonen and one by Nick Buck, the album includes covers of Buddy Holly's "It's So Easy", Muddy Waters' "I Can't Be Satisfied", and Chuck Berry's "Talkin' 'Bout You." We opened up in Leeds, England. "[45] Nevertheless, the album won another Grammy, again for Best Ethnic or Traditional Recording. [26] 1955 saw the departure of Jimmy Rogers, who quit to work exclusively with his own band, which had been a sideline until that time. [26] It was, as Ken Chang wrote in his AllMusic review, flooded with "contentious studio banter [...] more entertaining than the otherwise unmemorable music from this stylistic train wreck". [55] Eric Clapton served as best man at their wedding in 1979. [6][7] In 1943, he moved to Chicago to become a full-time professional musician. [12][13], He had his first introduction to music in church: "I used to belong to church. He later recalled arriving in Chicago as the single most momentous event in his life. [9], His grandmother, Della Grant, raised him after his mother died shortly after his birth. "Hoochie Coochie Man", was covered by Allman Brothers Band, Humble Pie, Steppenwolf, Supertramp and Fear. The next morning we were in the headlines of the paper, 'Screaming Guitar and Howling Piano'. Factory. [36] Folk Singer was not a commercial success, but it was lauded by critics, and in 2003 Rolling Stone magazine placed it at number 280 on its list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. In the early 1930s, Waters accompanied Big Joe Williams on tours of the Delta, playing harmonica. [17], In 1943, Muddy Waters headed to Chicago with the hope of becoming a full-time professional musician. In 1947, he played guitar with Sunnyland Slim on piano on the cuts "Gypsy Woman" and "Little Anna Mae". [14]. [58] He was taken from his Westmont home, which he lived in for the last decade of his life, to Good Samaritan Hospital in Downers Grove, Illinois,[59] where he was pronounced dead aged 70. [16] The complete recordings were reissued by Chess Records on CD as Muddy Waters: The Complete Plantation Recordings. [10] "Waters" was added years later, as he began to play harmonica and perform locally in his early teens. In 1946, he recorded his first records for Columbia Records and then for Aristocrat Records, a newly formed label run by the brothers Leonard and Phil Chess. In 1971, a show at Mister Kelly's, an upmarket Chicago nightclub, was recorded and released, signalling both Muddy Waters's return to form and the completion of his transfer to white audiences. [32], Although his performances alienated the old guard, some younger musicians, including Alexis Korner and Cyril Davies from Barber's band, were inspired to go in the more modern, electric blues direction. Angus Young, of the rock group AC/DC, has cited Muddy as one of his influences. Grant gave him the nickname "Muddy" at an early age because he loved to play in the muddy water of nearby Deer Creek. So I got all of my good moaning and trembling going on for me right out of church,"[14] he recalled.