& O.C. Current research often … Dynamic Programming in Economics is an outgrowth of a course intended for students in the first year PhD program and for researchers in Macroeconomics Dynamics. The baseline macroeconomic model we use is based on the assumption of perfect com-petition. The purpose of Dynamic Programming in Economics is twofold: (a) to provide a rigorous, but not too complicated, treatment of optimal growth … Dynamic Programming in Economics is an outgrowth of a course intended for students in the first year PhD program and for researchers in Macroeconomics Dynamics. Economics 2010c: Lecture 1 Introduction to Dynamic Programming David Laibson 9/02/2014. Behavioral Macroeconomics Via Sparse Dynamic Programming Xavier Gabaix March 16, 2017 Abstract This paper proposes a tractable way to model boundedly rational dynamic programming. The method was developed by Richard Bellman in the 1950s and has found applications in numerous fields, from aerospace engineering to economics.. It can be used by students and researchers in Mathematics as well as in Economics. 1 / 61 We assume throughout that time is discrete, since it leads to simpler and more intuitive mathematics. Dynamic programming is both a mathematical optimization method and a computer programming method. maximization and dynamic programming. Program in Economics, HUST Changsheng Xu, Shihui Ma, Ming Yi (yiming@hust.edu.cn) School of Economics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology This version: November 19, 2020 Ming Yi (Econ@HUST) Doctoral Macroeconomics Notes on D.P. It can be used by students and researchers in Mathematics as well as in Economics. Dynamic Programming & Optimal Control Advanced Macroeconomics Ph.D. Discrete time methods (Bellman Equation, Contraction Mapping Theorem, and Blackwell’s Sufficient Conditions, Numerical methods) Outline of my half-semester course: 1. In both contexts it refers to simplifying a complicated problem by breaking it down into simpler sub-problems in a recursive manner. Lecture Notes on Dynamic Programming Economics 200E, Professor Bergin, Spring 1998 Adapted from lecture notes of Kevin Salyer and from Stokey, Lucas and Prescott (1989) Outline 1) A Typical Problem 2) A Deterministic Finite Horizon Problem 2.1) Finding necessary conditions 2.2) A special case 2.3) Recursive solution